Turkey

Straddling western Asia and eastern Europe, Turkey’s rich cultural and historical legacy, combined with its sparkling coastline and warm, vivacious locals make it a stellar travel destination. Its seaside draw cards include the vibrant port city of Bodrum, the effortlessly elegant town of Kas, and the stunning beaches at the Fethiye, while its interior highlights include the hot mineral springs of Pamukkale, the bizarre rock formations of Cappadocia, and the ancient cliff temples of Dalyan. Istanbul presents a cosmopolitan, first-world city. From trendy restaurants and clubs to contemporary art galleries and five-star hotels and spas, the city offers a world of entertainment and leisure, which bustles between ancient monuments like the iconic, glorious Hagia Sophia. Famous for its hospitality, Turkey welcomes guests to explore its old-world charms while enjoying the best modern comforts.

Turkey

 

 

 

Rize Province

 

Set on the eastern Black Sea coast between Trabzon and Artvin, Turkey’s province of Rize is famous for its abundant tea plantations, which often spread over entire mountainsides. Travellers can go on various tea tasting tours, or visit over the time of the Summer Tea Festival, and sample the delicious Anzer honey grown here. The gorgeous swathes of tea farms set among alpine lakes, rugged mountains and ancient sacred buildings create a world of enthralling photographic opportunities. Nature lovers will enjoy the beautiful Uzungol camping spot, the wonderful hot springs at Ayder, and the pretty village of Camlihemsin, which provides the ideal base from which to trek the Kackar Mountains. Make sure to visit the capital city’s beautiful 16th-century Islam Pasha Mosque and Genoese Castle ruins.

 

Antalya

 

Antalya, the largest Tukish city on the Mediterranean coast, is a popular resort hub blessed with beautiful beaches and lush mountains. Both classically beautiful and stylishly modern, it is a multicultural community where Turkey’s Muslim, Christian, and Jewish faiths intersect. At the heart of Antalya lies the old city district of Kaleici, with narrow winding cobblestone streets that wrap around the old Roman-era harbour. Some of the other numerous historic sights include the distinctive Fluted Minaret (Yivli Minare), a prime example of Seljuk architecture; and ancient Roman buildings such as the Aspendos Roman theatre, believed to be the most well preserved in the world. Gorgeous white-sanded beaches like Konyaalti and Lara provide idyllic spots to spend the day, fringed by luxurious resorts, hotels, and restaurants. Make sure to visit the glorious Karst Springs, Karain Cave and Koprulu Canyon National Park.

 

Bodrum

 

Located in the Mugla Province of Turkey’s Aegean Region, Bodrum is a popular access point for travellers arriving by ferry from the Greek islands of Cos and Rhodes. This vibrant, glittering port city makes a fabulous introduction destination to Turkey. For the young and the restless, there’s the city’s legendary, sparkling nightlife – Turks claim that Bodrum has more bars per square kilometre than any other place in Turkey – while history buffs can explore the ancient ruins, elegant historical mosques, and multi-towered castle, dating to the Middle Ages. Alternatively, travellers looking for a more laid back experience can peruse Bodrum’s lively markets for souvenirs and trinkets, soak up some sun and sea at the peninsula’s lovely beaches, or enjoy leisurely strolls or long seafood lunches on the city’s palm-lined promenade.

 

Marmaris

 

Ideally located at the coastal meeting point of two mountains, Marmaris is a quaint port city, set along the Mediterranean shoreline of the Turkish Riviera. Known for its charming fishing villages, sailing and diving hotspots, and crystal clear waters, Marmaris has developed into a popular tourist destination with plenty to offer every type of traveller. Visitors can look forward to a vibrant nightlife on the famous Marmaris Bar Street, which houses live music bars, world-class clubs and a decadent array of restaurants. Don’t miss a daily excursion to the mud baths of Dalyan or a trip to Heaven Island to visit the Nimara Caves, an ancient and historical place of worship, which is home to a unique species of cave-dwelling butterflies.

Side

 

 

Set in close proximity to both Manavgat and Semlimiye, the city of Side lies about 20 kilometres east of the Eurymedon River mouth and two kilometres south of the Mediterranean Highway. It is an ancient city which attracts tourists with its luxurious resorts, as well as its many archaeological sites, such as the Temple of Apollo and the Greek Aspendos Amphitheatre, a structure built to overlook the ocean, still used for the occasional show today. Side is flanked by two beaches, and there are boat tours to neighbouring towns or out to sea to watch the turtles run from the shores. Many of the city’s streets are lined with charming little shops, selling Turkish carpets and other handcrafted goods, and every Thursday there is a lively market in Manavgat, a short bus ride away.

 

Canakkale

 

The seaside city of Canakkale, in northwestern Turkey’s Marmara region, boasts lush greenery, wide beaches, and fine restaurants serving a host of traditional Turkish culinary delights. It is often used as a base for exploring Troy and Gallipoli. Troy is believed to be at the site of the mythological Trojan war, and the ruins of a temple, a theatre, city walls and building foundations date back to nine periods of settlement. While Troy boasts its own replica of the Trojan Horse, a second replica, built for the movie Troy, is situated in Canakkale itself near the city’s waterfront promenade. The town also boasts fascinating local museums, charming little cobbled lanes and a lively nightlife scene bolstered by a spirited student population.

 

Oludeniz

 

Oludeniz is a popular resort located on the southwest coast of Turkey. With its vivid blue lagoon and scenic location at the foot of Babadag Mountain, Oludeniz is often referred to as ‘Turkey’s most beautiful beach’. Although Oludeniz has suffered in recent years from the effects of mass tourism, its white sands and inviting waters remain an extremely attractive option for travellers in the region, and it has developed niche appeal among paragliders, who sail over the lagoon after launching off from the mountain. Other exciting activities in the area include boat trips that explore islands filled with ancient archaeological sites; the Lycian Way, a long-distance coastal walking trail; and Butterfly Valley, a beautiful nature preserve within a scenic bay.

 

Edirne

 

Situated in the northwest of Turkey, close to the borders with Greece and Bulgaria, the old city of Edirne served as Turkey’s capital before Constantinople and is steeped in history. Visitors should be sure to visit the cherished World Heritage-listed Selimiye Mosque near the central square downtown. Dominating the skyline, it includes the incredible Turkish and Islamic Art Museum, which houses various Ottoman-era ethnographic and religious displays. In the city’s northwestern neighbourhoods, see the ruins of the 15th-century Sarayici palace. Because the Tundzha and Maritsa rivers run through the city, visitors can explore the numerous medieval stone-arch bridges that span the rivers and form a romantic feature of this city. Other unusual highlights include the town’s oil-wrestling tradition, its wonderful fruit-shaped soaps, and its cookie-like almond dessert, ‘badem ezmesi’.

 

Gocek

 

Situated in the Fethiye district of the beautiful province of Mugla, the small town of Gocek is known for no less than six marinas which serve as an important base for yachting tourism in the country. Gocek is a tranquil retreat as it is a Registered Area of Special Protection, which has kept over-development at bay. The idyllic town offers magnificent views of rugged mountains and spectacular turquoise waters and features upmarket cafes, bars, and restaurants. Visitors can enjoy a wide selection of activities including: boating, yachting and sailing excursions around the islands that dot the coast, as well as swimming and snorkelling in crystal-clear waters. Don’t miss the opportunity to explore the beautiful island of Katranci and ancient ruins at Lydae.

 

Cappadocia

 

Cappadocia, a large, semi-arid region deep in the heart of Turkey, is renowned for its otherworldly topography. Years of erosion have carved the rocky landscape into a sea of spikes, pillars and minarets. To make this fantastical destination even more intriguing, the region’s early inhabitants carved out its stony monoliths to form churches, monasteries and homes. The most visited of these is Goreme Open Air Museum (a UNESCO world heritage site) encompassing some 30 rock-hewn churches and chapels, some with frescos dating back as far as the ninth century AD. The area is also a popular trekking and hot-air ballooning location due to its splendid and fantastical scenery. Make sure to climb up to Uchisar, a rock castle at the highest point in the landscape, offering phenomenal panoramic views.

 

Izmir

 

Located on Turkey’s west coast, Izmir is Turkey’s third largest port and, with a recorded history of over 4000 years, has a vast and captivating cultural legacy. The city also has a wonderfully liberal, laid-back reputation – in no small part a spin-off of the many contemporary arts and music festivals hosted here each year. At Izmir’s heart lies its historical centre, the ancient district of Konak, where you can indulge in premium retail therapy at the bargain-rich Kemeralti Market. The delightful marina promenade is the perfect place to enjoy spectacular sunset views and delicious cuisine at one of the many restaurants and bars. There are both calm waters, ideal for training in watersports, as well as rougher coastal waters to challenge more advanced surfers. Make sure to visit the Balcova Springs, just ten kilometres west of the city.

 

Goreme

 

Situated in central Turkey’s Cappadocia region, the village of Goreme lies in the magnificent Goreme Valley. As one of Turkey’s top tourist centres, Goreme is best known for its location among the incredible historic natural rock formations known as the ‘fairy chimneys’. Visitors should explore the Goreme Open Air Museum, which showcases these incredible formations and features the Tokali Kilise church in a cave near the museum’s entrance. As the town itself is located within the Göreme National Park, it serves as an ideal base from which to explore this impressive UNESCO World Heritage Park. Other popular attractions include the many easily accessible hiking and mountain biking trails that loop around the Güllüdere Vadısı or Rose Valley and the Humami or Turkish bath in the town centre offering steam rooms, mud face masks, soap massages, and scrubbing.

 

Fethiye

Set on Turkey’s southwestern Turquoise Coast, Fethiye is one of Turkey’s finest and least commercial coastal escapes. The city’s laid back ambience, sparkling Mediterranean waters and glistening amber sunsets make it an irresistible getaway. A highlight of the area is the idyllic seaside destination of Oludeniz, with its calm, cobalt bay and long sandy beach, where travellers can take their pick from a smorgasbord of leisure and adventure pursuits, including parasailing, snorkelling expeditions and boat cruises. One of the favourite destinations for the latter is nearby Butterfly Valley, offering dramatic cliffs, secluded coves and – as the name promises – countless colourful butterflies to enchant those who visit. Alternatively, a stroll around town will allow you to sample a mouth-watering array of freshly made Turkish delight, or enjoy apple tea with one of the local carpet purveyors.

 

Alanya

The popular beach resort town of Alanya is located on Turkey’s central Mediterranean coast and is known for its exquisite hotels and spectacular white sand beaches. Chief among these is Cleopatra Beach, believed to be a favoured swimming spot of the Egyptian queen. Apart from spending some quality leisure time on the beaches or in the luxurious hotels lining the coast, visitors should be sure to visit Alanya Castle, a huge Seljuk-era fort and open-air museum that surmounts the rocky peninsula providing wonderful views across the town and the Cilician mountains. Other must-see attractions include: Tersane, Turkey’s last remaining Seljuk-built shipyard; the Red Tower, an octagonal defence tower built to protect the castle; and Ehmedek, a Turkish fortress built during Ottoman and Seljuk times.

 

Kemer

 

Set on the Turkish Riviera, 40 kilometres west of Antalya on the country’s southern Mediterranean coast, the resort city of Kemer boasts a spectacular combination of natural and heritage attractions. The picturesque stretch of pebble beach and the large accompanying marina provide not only an idyllic spot for swimming, boating or having a meal, but also some excellent photographic opportunities. Take a cable car up the Tahtali Mountain in the Olympos Beydagları National Park to see jaw-dropping views of the forests and bay. History enthusiasts will enjoy exploring the antique Idryos, a Byzantine church and a Seljuk Turkish hunting lodge. From here, take a day trip to the Adrasan Bay, an hour’s drive away, for an exquisite beach and scenery.

 

Selime

 

Situated in the District of Guzelyurt, the town of Selime is set in the Aksaray Province in Turkey. It is famed as the home of the Selime Monastery, the undeniable highlight of the town. This fascinating monastery has been cut into the rock and is one of the most unique structures in the country. It is the largest religious structure in the Cappadocia region. Visitors can also look forward to visiting the Monumental Tomb, the Selime Sultan Turbe, boasting an architectural style from the 13th century AD and is the only example of it’s kind in the Anatolia region.

 

Cesme

 

Located west of Izmir Province on the Aegean Sea, the coastal resort town of Cesme is set on one of Turkey’s most beautiful stretches of coastline, boasting pristine golden beaches lapped by wonderfully warm waters. This magnificent coastline offers some of the world’s best surfing, windsurfing, and kitesurfing conditions, as well as a number of popular hangout spots such as Ilica Beach, which features warm thermal sulphur springs and crystal-clear waters ideal for scuba diving. Other popular attractions in the area include the Cesme Museum, housed in a beautifully-restored castle built by the Genoese; Okuz Mehmet Pasa Kervansaray, an historic caravanserai converted into popular hotel; and a bustling commercial centre filled with unique boutique shops and excellent local eateries.

 

Belek

 

Situated on Turkey’s southern Mediterranean coastline, Belek is a popular tourist town known for its scenic beaches and its excellent opportunities for outdoor sport and leisure activities. Visitors can look forward to spending days on the blue-flag beaches, meandering and picnicking through pretty parks, or bathing in one of the upmarket thermal spa resorts’ medicinal baths. Other popular activities include taking a trip to the Roman amphitheatre at Aspendos, which still hosts regular open-air classical music, opera and ballet performances; visiting the Kursunlu Waterfall, a natural wonder amid the bird-rich pine forests; and teeing off at one of the area’s world-class golf courses, surrounded by luxurious hotels.

 

Kalkan

 

Located in Mediterranean Turkey along the breathtakingly beautiful Lycian Coast, Kalkan boasts clear azure sea, historic architecture, and remarkably warm and welcoming locals. This upmarket harbourside town is set lovely green hills overlooking the glistening Mediterranean and offers swimmers a small but central pebbled beach and some convenient swimming platforms or ‘lidos’ that flank the bay and are accessible by shuttle boats. Stroll along the picturesque harbour, decorated with Turkish wooden gulets, or dine at one of the waterfront restaurants, and then explore the alluring old town which spreads up from here. History enthusiasts will enjoy the chance to discover the preserved nineteenth-century Greek houses and traditional Kalkan architecture. Nearby attractions include the ancient ruins of Patara and the gorgeous Xanthos Valley.

 

Alacati

 

Alacati is an idyllic little Mediterranean town set on the west coast of Turkey on the Cesme Peninsula. This attractive seaside resort is known for its magnificent white sand beaches strung along the crystal-clear Aegean Sea, as well as for its beautiful old cobblestone streets, Greek-style stone houses and high quality traditional vineyards. Visitors can enjoy a range of activities from world-class windsurfing in the steady year-round breeze, to fun-filled nights in and around the atmospheric Kemal Pasa Street lined with bars and restaurants specialising in Aegean cuisine. Don’t miss the chance to visit the Alacati yacht marina and the renowned Port Alacati development, created by the famous French architect, Francois Spoerry.

 

Alanya

 

The popular beach resort town of Alanya is located on Turkey’s central Mediterranean coast and is known for its exquisite hotels and spectacular white sand beaches. Chief among these is Cleopatra Beach, believed to be a favoured swimming spot of the Egyptian queen. Apart from spending some quality leisure time on the beaches or in the luxurious hotels lining the coast, visitors should be sure to visit Alanya Castle, a huge Seljuk-era fort and open-air museum that surmounts the rocky peninsula providing wonderful views across the town and the Cilician mountains. Other must-see attractions include: Tersane, Turkey’s last remaining Seljuk-built shipyard; the Red Tower, an octagonal defence tower built to protect the castle; and Ehmedek, a Turkish fortress built during Ottoman and Seljuk times.

 

Icmeler

 

Located only 8 kilometres from the busy port of Marmaris, the popular Turkish holiday resort town of Icmeler serves as an excellent seaside refuge, occupying the southernmost part of the Marmaris Bay. Sharing in the atmosphere of the Mediterranean and the Aegean Seas, and with the magnificent Taurus mountains as a backdrop, Icmemer’s golden sand and warm water beaches are ideal for swimming and sunbathing, as well as enjoying a variety of water sports activities including scuba diving, waterskiing and snorkeling. Apart from exploring the gorgeous coast, visitors should be sure to peruse the the popular market at the town centre for exotic food, colourful clothes and locally-crafted handmade jewellery. Although taxi boats to Marmaris are easily available, many visitors choose to walk the trail from Icmeler to Marmaris along the legendary Aegean Coast of Marmaris Bay.

Kusadasi

 

 

Perched on Turkey’s Aegean coast, Kusadasi – with its stellar facilities, sundrenched beaches and elegant new harbour welcoming luxury cruise liners – is a major cruise ship destination and the epitome of a modern European town. Travellers are spoilt for choice here in terms of leisure and sightseeing opportunities: Kusadasi has everything from aquaparks and thermal resorts to lively markets and state-of-the-art shopping centres. The city’s pulsating nightlife is a magnet for party-lovers, while scuba-diving excursions, boat cruises and national park tours provide plenty to keep outdoor enthusiasts entertained. It’s well worth factoring in day trips to Selcuk (popular for skydiving and the location of the annual Camel Wrestling Festival), the ruins at Ephesus, and Guvercin Adası or ‘Pigeon Island’ situated on the peninsula at the end of the bay.

 

Ankara

 

Ankara is Turkey’s capital and the second largest city in the country. Set at the heart of Anatolia, the town is the hub of many great civilisations with a history dating back to the Stone Age, and its landmarks are still of great importance in the present day. Highlights include the massive, imposing Anit Kabir, the mausoleum of modern Turkey’s founder, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (1881–1938); the well-preserved Citadel area, with inner walls dating back to the seventh century; and the beautiful Haci Bayram Camii Mosque, built in the 15th century. The town boasts some superb museums, most notably the incredible Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, housing the best artefacts from significant sites around Anatolia. Make sure to try the area’s mouth-watering doner kebabs, honey and Kalecik Karasi grapes.

 

Bursa

 

Lying in the foothills of the dramatic Mount Uludağ near the Sea of Marmara in northwest Turkey, the large city of Bursa has been dubbed ‘Green Bursa’ in reference to its many parks, gardens and vast surrounding forests. It is also known for its many ancient mosques and historical sites from the early Ottoman Empire. The main attraction is undoubtedly the majestic 14th-century Ulu Camii or Grand Mosque, featuring Seljuk-style arches and twenty stately domes towering overhead. Other must-see sights include the Ottoman-era Muradiye Complex, located in a lovely shady park, the Yeşil Türbe mausoleum of the 5th Ottoman sultan; and the Yeşil Camii or Green Mosque, which features exquisite green mosaic tiles, as well as a varied collection of historic artworks.

 

Kayseri

 

Resting at the foot of the extinct volcano, Mount Erciyes, west of Cappadocia, Kayseri is an old, large and industrialized metropolis. Discover the charming city centre’s massive bustling bazaars, Seljuk and Ottoman-era monuments, and the more famous fairy-chimney vistas to the city’s west. Kayseri boasts an intriguing historical legacy including Seljuk tombs, ancient mosques and fascinating museums, as well as a vast 2000-year-old Byzantine castle. Art and culture lovers will particularly enjoy the Museum of Seljuk Civilisation, with gorgeous exhibits and chic multimedia displays. The winter months provide some the excellent runs for downhill skiers at the local ski centre, while summer is ideal for river rafting on the lovely Zamanti River. Kayseri is also famous for its exquisite carpets, which are made in the fine floral patterns of the age-old tradition.

 

Trabzon

 

Resting on the Black Sea Coast of northeast Turkey, Trabzon is the largest city in the Eastern Black Sea Region. The metropolis boasts an abundance of extraordinary heritage architecture. The glorious medieval Aya Sofya Mosque, with its interior of beautiful mosaics, was first a church, then a mosque, then a Russian storage facility and hospital, and was eventually restored as a mosque in the 1960s. Other highlights include the Byzantine monastery at Sumela – a graceful 18th-century single-domed caravanserai and bathhouse – and many others. There is plenty of nature to explore in the surrounds, with verdant forests, magnificent mountains and the picturesque Uzungol Lake. Despite these elements, the city remains the biggest Black Sea Port and is a distinctly modern hub. Trabzon is also known for its popular soccer team and its delicious fish.

 

Urgup

 

Located in the Central Anatolia region of Turkey, Urgup is considered by many to be the ideal starting-point for a trip into the celebrated area of Cappadocia. This historical region is rightly regarded as one of Turkey’s premier attractions, and provides for many visitors their enduring impression of the country. The area boasts a number of geological marvels including the renowned Goreme Open Air Museum, a 4th-Century series of religious buildings carved into the soft volcanic rock. Other popular attractions include an interesting museum housing an impressive collection of ancient artefacts, as well as a fine selection of boutique hotels and inns – many of which offer accommodation in the traditional troglodyte-style homes of the Cappadocian hills.

Dalyan

 

Surrounded by lush vegetation and famous for its tropical flowers and rare birds, Dalyan is situated on the south-west coast of Turkey on the Mediterranean sea. The town retains its sleepy, riverside atmosphere while boasting a host of attractions from historical to environmental. Not to be missed attractions include the Kaunos King’s Tombs, carved directly from rock, as well as the fascinating ruins of the ancient trading city of Kaunosare, which date back to the tenth century B.C. Pleasant Iztuzu beach is a protected breeding ground for the Loggerhead sea turtle and visitors can also enjoy the healing mud baths and hot springs surrounding the city. Other popular activities include taking a scenic boat trip up the Dalyan Cali River, exploring the beautiful Sulungur Lake, and catching Mayi Yengec crabs, which are considered to be a delicious local delicacy.

 

Sirince

 

Just 9 kilometres from the transport hub of Selcuk on Turkey’s Aegean coastline, Sirince – which means ‘pretty’ in Turkish – is one of the country’s most attractive tourist destinations. With its dramatic mountainside setting and its famous vineyards and orchards, Sirince Village is a food and wine lover’s dream, playing host to thousands of day visitors each weekend. The town’s unique (and legally protected) architecture – a sea of white buildings with red-tiled roofs – makes Sirince extremely photogenic, and it is a lovely place to walk around, full of narrow, twisting streets that lead visitors from shop to shop and cellar to cellar. If you need gifts for loved ones back home, the local wine, olives and handmade soap make excellent presents.

 

Alibey Island

Dotted with scenic olive groves and surrounded by a gorgeous beach, Alibey Island (also known as Cunda Island) is connected to the town of Ayvalik via a bridge on Turkey’s northwestern coast. The island is home to a typical Aegean resort town, brimming with an array of historical and gastronomic treats. A must-see sight is the restored Taksiarchis Church, a former Greek Orthodox church surrounded by picturesque Ottoman Greek houses. Other Neoclassical architecture in the form of churches, monasteries and mosques pay homage to the island’s complex history of settlers. Many restaurants line the shoreline serving up mezze, seafood and olive-oil-infused foods. Tas Kahve will give you the opportunity to sip tea with the locals. Don’t miss the chance to explore the island’s north coast, known for its idyllic beaches including the famous Poroselene Bay Beach.

 

Sedir Island

 

Also known as Cleopatra Island, Sedir Island is an exquisite piece of paradise in Turkey’s Gulf of Gokova, known for its idyllic little beaches lapped by the crystal clear waters of the Mediterranean Sea. It is believed that the famous Pharaoh and her lover bathed in these pristine turquoise waters. The island’s main drawcard is its soft white sand made from ground seashells, unusual in its light colour and texture and a rarity in the eastern Mediterranean. Visitors can look forward to exploring the spectacularly scenic Gokova Bay, where it is possible to catch a traditional Turkish wooden to explore the bays many secluded alcoves. Don’t miss the island’s collection of Roman ruins, including a fourth century B.C. amphitheatre.

 

Tenedos Island

 

In the northeastern Aegean Sea lies the small, picturesque Turkish Island of Tenedos, connected by ferry boat to nearby towns such as Canakkale and Geyikli. The small Old Town area is found on the northeast of the island, and is so compact you can walk from one side to the other in about 10 minutes. The rest of the island is populated by vineyards and scattered pine woods, with housing estates near the coastline. A celebrated activity on Tenedos is to grab a bottle of the delicious local wine at sunset, and head to the lighthouse to watch the sun sink below the horizon. Meanwhile, tourists who are interested in the history of Tenedos can visit the ramparted Bozcaada Castle, which has been renovated a number of times since the 1600s.

 

Rize Province

 

Set on the eastern Black Sea coast between Trabzon and Artvin, Turkey’s province of Rize is famous for its abundant tea plantations, which often spread over entire mountainsides. Travellers can go on various tea tasting tours, or visit over the time of the Summer Tea Festival, and sample the delicious Anzer honey grown here. The gorgeous swathes of tea farms set among alpine lakes, rugged mountains and ancient sacred buildings create a world of enthralling photographic opportunities. Nature lovers will enjoy the beautiful Uzungol camping spot, the wonderful hot springs at Ayder, and the pretty village of Camlihemsin, which provides the ideal base from which to trek the Kackar Mountains. Make sure to visit the capital city’s beautiful 16th-century Islam Pasha Mosque and Genoese Castle ruins.